IndieLisboa’s International Competition of Shorts, film by film

IndieLisboa 2019 international competition is closed. The section aims to screen the first, second and third films never before shown publicly in Portugal will feature a selection of 32 films that are a showcase for new names, ideas and artistic universes.

It’s worth highlighting the contamination of the international competition for short films with video game aesthetics, in a selection of films that bring the graphics, languages ​​and habits of the gamer community to the big screen. Whether it is the question of perspective and the look of one scene in Fest (Nikita Diakur); or we see ourselves in a post-apocalyptic New York in Operation Jane Walk (Robin Klengel and Leonhard Müllner); or the discovery of a new form of online harassment that has spread in online streaming, in Swatted (Ismaël Joffroy Chandoutis).

And as in previous edition, the competition is also marked with some returns. Such as Emmanuel Marre (best fiction short film in 2017 with Le film de l’été), with D’un château l’autre, a documentary about a young voter, undecided between Macron and Le Pen, which won the Golden Leopard in 2018; and Lawrence Abu Hamdan (Rubber Coated Steel, IndieLisboa 2017), who continues his investigation into the use of sound in a judicial context. In Walled Unwalled, a film where the walls serve as a pretext to discuss limits (of sound) between what is private and what is public. And it’s also worth mentioning Sara Fgaier (editor, among others, of Pietro Marcello’s La bocca del lupo, IndieLisboa 2010), who works with archive images in The Years, to tell the story of a woman and her decades by the sea of Sardinia.

International Short Film Competition

Je sors acheter des cigarettes, by Osman Cerfon
In Je sors acheter des cigarettes, 12 year old Jonathan lives with his mother and sister and also with a buch of monkey-men hiding in closets and the washing machine.

Swatted, by Ismaël Joffroy Chandoutis
Swatting is a form of online harassment in which a player is reported to the police while live streaming so that their house is invaded and he is arrested, for the whole Internet to see. Swatted is an inventive documentary consisting of several YouTube videos and testimonies of victims of this phenomenon.

Fest, by Nikita Diakur
A neighborhood party, music, drones, food and ice cream. And then, acrobatics. Fest is an animated simulation based on YouTube videos.

TurbineAlex Boya
In Turbine, the obsession with work is clear: an airplane pilot has a turbine face and falls in love with a fan. What drastic measures will your wife take to get you back?

Tombent les heures, by Blanca Camell Gali
A girl was about to leave but then the bus was gone and she stayed. In Tombent les heures, we wander around the city and get to know to people, love is spoken and chaabbi music is heard with a glass in hand, a smile on our face and a suitcase in the corner of the room.

Foyers, by Paul Heintz
Paul Heintz (Non-contractuel, IndieLisboa 2016) returns to the festival with a trip to the universe of a pyromaniac, who tells us about his dreams and desires and how these are linked by the subconscious to his fascination with fire.

Huile sur vent, by Alejandro Perez
On an island in southern Spain, a lonely man collects olives from a landscape made of water and dry twigs. Huile sur vent makes us slide through the languid autumn in picturesque reflections.

Take Me Please, by Olivér Hegyi
The relationship is over, she’s got another person and he can not stop crying. Get me out of here! Take Me Please is a road movie through the surreal universe of depression, among bathroom clairvoyants and alien voyeurs.

Guaxuma, by Nara Normande
The sea breeze brings back memories and Brazilian director Nara Normande remembers her best friend from childhood, Tayra. Guaxuma is a sweet animated collection of when the whole world was made of sand and friendship.

The Flood is Coming, by Gabriel Böhmer
The psychotic animation by Gabriel Böhmer (Beetle Trouble, IndieLisboa 2018) returns to IndieLisboa with a premonition, The Flood is Coming: a hermit prepares for a catastrophe but his noisy eye only worsens his anxiety.

Les idées s’améliorent, by Léo Richard
A basement hides a bunch of people working in front of their computers. Their job? To identify human emotions in order to teach an artificial intelligence to read faces. But there is an expression that no one can decode.

Acid Rain, by Tomek Popakul
A young woman gets hitchhiked by a man of the weird but fun type. The conversion keeps flowing and all of a sudden they are both freaking out on an acid trip in Acid Rain. New worlds are discovered, some more beautiful than others.

Operation Jane Walk, by Robin Klengel Leonhard Müllner
‘Tom Clancy’s: The Division’ is a video game in which New York City has been recreated in detail. With a gun in our hands, we are guided by a post-apocalyptic city and the history of its buildings in Operation Jane Walk.

D’un chateau l’autre, by Emmanuel Marre
Emmanuel Marre returns to IndieLisboa with D’un chateau l’autre, an intimate documentary about a young voter, undecided between Macron and Le Pen. The film won the Golden Leopard in 2018.

Princesa Morta de Jacuí, by Marcela Bordin Island
In the Central Depression, the sun never ceases to shine. It was there that the archaeologist Margot Moreira was born and it is there that she returns, in order to cure her ‘Disability Syndrome’, thus rewriting History. Princesa Morta de Jacuí is an anachronistic sci-fi film about the astonishment of progress.

Past Perfect, by Jorge Jácome
Jorge Jácome (Flores, A Guest + A Host = A Ghost and Plutão) leads us, through a geography of melancholy, into a series of free associations that cross several centuries of History. Past Perfect finally asks the questions: where is the place for sadness?

Suc Syndria, by Irene Moray
A couple spends their summer holidays with friends, but a past trauma haunts their well-being. In Suc Syndria, tears and watermelon juice heal wounds and redefine sexualities.

Walled Unwalled, by Lawrence Abu Hamdan
After the extraordinary Rubber Coated Steel (IndieLisboa 2017), Abu Hamdan continues his investigation into the use of sound in a judicial context. Walled Unwalled is a performative documentary about the (sound) boundaries between the private and the public.

I Got My Things And Left, by Philbert Aimé Mbabazi Sharangabo
A group of young people in Kigali (capital of Rwanda) meet for the wake of a mutual friend: he died young, but fought against conformism. I Got My Things And Left explored the vivid memories that look into the future.

Lunar-Orbit Rendezvous, by Mélanie Charbonneau
A woman dressed as a tampon joins a man dressed as an astronaut on a trip to the moon to lay the ashes of his mother while she prays for the period to return. Lunar-Orbit Rendezvous is a modern fairy tale.

Tonnerre sur mer, by Yotam Ben-David
In the evening, some bright tennis shoes illuminate the foliage. Three 19 year old friends meet and talk about the paths they have chosen for their lives. The lightning flashes in the distance, behind the hills. The future of their friendship is uncertain: Tonnerre sur mer.

Les petites vacances, by Louise Groult
Charlotte and her cousin go on a vacation, she meets a boy, who is older and has a girlfriend. But it’s summer and the desire tightens. Les petites vacances is a portrait of the turbulent ways in which sexuality is communicated.

De longs discours dans vos cheveux, by Alexandre Steiger
Paul and Adèle are two extras in the  ‘Tristan and Isolde’ opera who roam the underground of the Garnier Palace. A labyrinthine path and a winding conversation about love, in De longs discours dans vos cheveux.

The Years, by Sara Fgaier
Sara Fgaier (film editor of such films as La bocca del lupo by Pietro Marcello, IndieLisboa 2010) works with archival images in The Years in order to tell the story of a woman and her decades by the Sardinian sea.

The Curse of the Phantom Tympanum, by Graeme Cole
Graeme Cole (honorable mention for It’s Nick’s Birthday at IndieLisboa 2009) returns to the festival with a haunting time travel through an amusement park made up of virtual realities of the immaterial heritage of mankind. Ruined holograms, divine cyborgs and smart statues make up this dystopia full of cardboard boxes and Super8 film: The Curse of the Phantom Tympanum.

Duerrenwaid 8, by Kirsten Carina Geißer and Ines Christine Geißer
Duerrenwaid 8 is an animated documentary that fuses stories about a house, a garden and a stream, and also about hives and huts in the forest: different times intersect in the shredded memory.

A Million Years, by Danech San
A river-side restaurant, a woman and a man, silence, trees fluttering in the wind, and the past projected on the other side of the river: reality merges and fear looms from the depths in A Million Years.

The Girl With Two Heads, by Betzabé Garcia (in the picture)
Anne is torn between two modes of femininity: that of her traditional and conservative family and the one she explores in the gym (and social networks) when she trains Greco-Roman wrestling. The Girl With Two Heads explores the issues of body representation and self-awareness.

The Sasha, by María Molina Peiró
In 1972, astronaut Charles Duke landed on the moon. His job? To take photos of Earth from the lunar surface. Today, almost nobody knows about his pictures. The Sasha is a story about this and other images of Earth.

Life After Love, by Zachary Epcar
The artist Zachary Epcar observes car fleets parked as symbols of individuality and collective alienation. Life After Love is a sad poem made out of hot asphalt, smudged glasses and self-help phrases.

La bala de Sandoval, by Jean-Jacques Martinod
Sandoval had a near-death experience because of a bullet. When he recovered from it, a broken bottle almost got him killed. But he survived. La bala de Sandoval is an enigmatic reflection on luck and destiny.

Octane, by Jeron Braxton
A man must race through hell and back to get what he wants in Octone.

IndieLisboa 2019 closer and closer

IndieLisboa is getting closer by the minute and it’s all happening in the capital between May 2nd and May 12th. Watch the first teaser for the festival below to get in the mood.

You don’t need to wait until the festival comes to discover all about its programming. On April 2nd, the full list of films will be revealed. Follow the festival on all of its social media to find out all about it.

Early bird vouchers are available for sale at a reduced prize until April 17th. More info here.

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Twitter: https://twitter.com/IndieLisboa19
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From the real to the virtual: a look at a contaminated world in IndieLisboa’s International Competition

A total of 42 films will premiere in the 16th edition of IndieLisboa. From the short films all the way to the features, we take a look at the daily life of a world that is questioning its borders: between human and digital, memory and truth, intimacy and public space, reality and fiction, feminine and male.

In terms of features, we’re adding to the already announced Temporada, by André Novais Oliveira, and Jessica Forever, by Caroline Poggi and Jonathan Vinel, other films such as Ne travaille pas, by César Vayssié, a film that lacks any words which follows the intimacy of a couple with the visual frenzy we’re used to in our day lives. It is also on the big screen that Shengze Zhu finds the stories that surround Present.Perfect, a portrait about how chatrooms and mobile phones have brought new horizons to the lives of lonely people in China. From the virtual to the streets, in So Pretty (in the picture), by Jessie Jeffrey Dunn Rovinelli, we follow the life of a queer community in the face of the onslaughts of the far right, while in Thou Shalt Not Kill, Cătălin Rotaru and Virginia Şarga denounce how the corruption is costing lives in Romanian public hospitals.

De los nombres de las cabras, by Silvia Navarro and Miguel G. Morales, a world premiere, questions the historical memory of the Guanches people, dismantling colonial myths and denouncing the complex map of powers which writes the historical discourse. In Bait, Mark Jenkin confronts us with the impacts of excessive tourism in Cornwall’s fragile fishing economy. We close this look on fiction with Lost Holiday, by Michael Kerry Matthews and Thomas Matthews: A road movie about two bumbling detectives, propelled by alcohol, drugs, abductions, violence, and De nuevo otra vez, directed and performed by Romina Paula, in an intriguing game between documentary and fiction.

It’s worth highlighting the contamination of the international competition for short films with video game aesthetics, in a selection of films that bring the graphics, languages ​​and habits of the gamer community to the big screen. Whether it is the question of perspective and the look of one scene in Fest (Nikita Diakur); or we see ourselves in a post-apocalyptic New York in Operation Jane Walk (Robin Klengel and Leonhard Müllner); or the discovery of a new form of online harassment that has spread in online streaming, in Swatted (Ismaël Joffroy Chandoutis).

And as in previous edition, the competition is also marked with some returns. Such as Emmanuel Marre (best fiction short film in 2017 with Le film de l’été), with D’un château l’autre, a documentary about a young voter, undecided between Macron and Le Pen, which won the Golden Leopard in 2018; and Abu Hamdan (Rubber Coated Steel, IndieLisboa 2017), who continues his investigation into the use of sound in a judicial context. In Walled Unwalled, a film where the walls serve as a pretext to discuss limits (of sound) between what is private and what is public. And it’s also worth mentioning Sara Fgaier (editor, among others, of Pietro Marcello’s La bocca del lupo, IndieLisboa 2010), who works with archive images in The Years, to tell the story of a woman and her decades by the sea of Sardinia.

Save money on tickets thanks to the early bird vouchers

The special early bird vouchers for IndieLisboa are back and they give you access to 10 tickets at unique prices. There are only 100 books available in this special edition.

Available for sale at the online Tickeline store and Culturgest ticket booth, exclusively between March 19th and Abril 17th.

The vouchers, once purchased online, can be picked up at the central IndieLisboa ticket booths, located at Culturgest and Cinema São Jorge. Vouchers are valid for regular film screenings, except film-concert, Mouth of Madness marathon and video game performance.

More info about early bird vouchers here.

Between May 2nd and 12th, the 2019 edition of IndieLisboa will take place at Cinema São Jorge, Culturgest and Cinema Ideal with a program that will include more than 200 films recently produced.

The Beach Bum and Synonymes will be IndieLisboa’s opening and closing films

The Beach Bum follows the hilarious misadventures of Moondog (Matthew McConaughey), who always lives by his own rules. With Snoop Dog, Zac Efron and Isla Fisher, The Beach Bum is a refreshing comedy by director Harmony Korine which will be screened at the opening ceremony of IndieLisboa, scheduled for May 2nd at the Cinema São Jorge. Synonymes, winner of the Golden Bear at Berlinale, will be the festival’s closing film. Nadav Lapid’s film tells the story of a young Israelite who rejects his country and his language to live in Paris.

Returning to the festival is also the filmography of Mike Leigh, one of the most renowned British filmmakers today. Screened as part of the Silvestre section will be Peterloo, a reenactment of the massacre of the same name, resulting from the attack of the British crown to a peaceful pro-democracy demonstration. I Was at Home But, by Angela Schanelec, winner of the Silver Bear in Berlin, will also premiere at IndieLisboa’s venues. A touching drama that tracks how a teenager’s existential issues can redefine the way adults act around her. Another award-winning film at Berlinale will be screened at IndieLisboa: Three Faces, by Jafar Panahi (a director in house arrest on charges of anti-regime propaganda), which brings together three actresses in different states of their career to question some of the most deeply rooted traditions of Iranian patriarchal society.

Get a head start and buy 10 IndieLisboa tickets on the Ticketline website for a reduced prices thanks to our early bird vouchers. Exclusive sale between March 19th and April 17th. Vouchers bought online can be picked up at the central IndieLisboa ticket booths, located at Culturgest and Cinema São Jorge. More info about the exchange for tickets here.

The 16th edition of IndieLisboa – International Film Festival takes place from May 2nd to May 12th at Cinema São Jorge, Culturgest, Cinema Ideal and Cinemateca Portuguesa.

Bring your school class to IndieJunior 2019

The festival’s educational service, which works in partnership with schools across the country, has already scheduled 27 screenings for students and teachers. There are more than 8000 registered children so far.

Divided between screenings for schools and for families, IndieJunior presents films screenings composed of recent and unreleased short films from around the world, divided by ages: preschool / + 3 years; + 6 years, + 9 years; + 12 years. These films are in competition and the audience has a say at the end of each screening, by voting on the films they like best and by helping decide which film gets the audience award.

Animation, fiction and documentary films are chosen in order to correspond to the interests, problems and inspirations of each age group, with the aim of establishing a communication relationship between film and viewer, leaving space for debate, reflection, fun and invention at the festival, at school, at home, and in life.

To book your own school screening, follow the link: www.indiejunior.com/escolaslisboa

The full program of films and parallel activities of the children’s section of the festival will be announced in early April.

IndieJunior is coming and you’re invited to dive in

IndieJunior is almost here, along with all the films for IndieLisboa’s younger audience. This year’s edition promises fresh, risky and fun dives for the younger ones and their families. The most spectacular ones will happen inside the film theatres – whether in a pool made of paper (La Plongeuse), a pile of fluffy white clouds (Kite) or a mountain full of snow (Hors Piste) .

There will also be the chance to dive inside a universe of ​​music, with the film-concert produced in partnership with Casa da Música. On one hand, you’ll have the original music, by three resident musicians of Casa da Música’s Educational Service, António Serginho, Óscar Rodrigues and Pedro Cardoso (Peixe). On the other, a couple of films of two of the greatest figures of the silent film era: Charlie Chaplin (Easy Street) and Buster Keaton (One Week). A trip to early cinema, which will take place on May 4th – 16h, at Culturgest.

It’s also worth mentioning the Somewhere between Heaven and Earth screening, which will bring together short films that will delight little ones and grown-ups alike and celebrate the relationships, be they between grandparents and grandchildren (Kite), dogs and aliens (Ambassadors of the Cosmos), or between a cat and its owner (Bamboule). This program will even include a Picnic on Grass, which will be open to the whole family.

Divided between screenings for schools and for families, IndieJunior presents films screenings composed of recent and unreleased short films from around the world, divided by ages: preschool / + 3 years; + 6 years, + 9 years; + 12 years. These films are in competition and the audience has a say at the end of each screening, by voting on the films they like best and by helping decide which film gets the audience award.

Animation, fiction and documentary films are chosen in order to correspond to the interests, problems and inspirations of each age group, with the aim of establishing a communication relationship between film and viewer, leaving space for debate, reflection, fun and invention at the festival, at school, at home, and in life. The full program of films and parallel activities of the children’s section of the festival will be announced in early April.

The festival’s educational service, which works in partnership with schools across the country, has already scheduled 27 screenings for students and teachers. There are more than 8000 registered children so far. To book your own school screening, follow the link: www.indiejunior.com/escolaslisboa

Independent Hero: Brazil in a Trance

In the aftermath of the Brazilian carnival, Mangueira’s victory with its depiction of Marielle and the #goldenshowerbolsonaro, the whole country of Brazil trembles between opposing tectonic forces: it is time for us to give a little help by shedding a light on the darkness of opportunism. All cinema is political, take a look at the programming of this Independent Hero of IndieLisboa 2019, the beloved films coming straight from Brazil.

Twenty-five years ago, Brazilian cinema was being retaken. 1994 marked the return to national production, after the period of interregnum in which Collor de Mello had dissipated all the support and incentives to cinematographic creation. In 2019, the country and its cinema are living turbulent times, an issue which we decided not to ignore.

After Brazilian films garnered IndieLisboa’s main awards in 2018, it is time to celebrate creativity and to support a community who is experiencing a particularly auspicious period. In this program, we will show very recent and never before premiered films in Portugal, mirroring a daring and politically awakened production. We will (also) be the voice and a place for cinema and will actively contribute to its continuity.

A love letter from IndieLisboa to Brazil’s year in film, this program reflects the proximity between the festival and a fearless and original type of cinema that has been on IndieLisboa’s radar since its first edition. It is time to pay homage to this long relationship, in a period when the world asks us to pay attention and to do our part.

Aside the feature films, another set of recent short films will be screened, which we’ll unveil soon. The full program will also have echoes of Brazilian cinema in the International Competition, National Competition, Silvestre and Mouth of Madness sections. Find out more about those on April 2nd. Guests of the program will be in Lisbon for a conversation about the present and future of Brazilian cinema.

Program:

A Noite Amarela, Ramon Porto Mota
A Rosa Azul de Novalis, Gustavo Vinagre, Rodrigo Carneiro
Divino Amor, Gabriel Mascaro
Domingo, Clara Linhart, Fellipe Barbosa
Fabiana, Brunna Laboissière
No Coração do Mundo, Gabriel Martins, Maurilio Martins (in the picture)
Os Jovens Baumann, Bruna Carvalho Almeida
Querência, Helvécio Marins Jr
Seus Ossos e Seus Olhos, Caetano Gotardo
Temporada, André Novais Oliveira

idealista present at IndieLisboa 2019

In its 2019 edition, IndieLisboa will have the help of the idealista brand as one of its sponsors. This partnership reinforces the festival’s strategy to join forces with brands from different sectors, which can be actively integrated in both marketing and creation of activations that become part of the festival, since idealista believes in the capacity of the event to generate value and return.

The real estate advertising portal idealista brand will be a good example of this strategy. The joint creation of actions will strengthen the link between the two brands and the creation of content will be very fruitful. We will have more news about these very soon.

“Over at idealista, we are very proud to support cinema at the largest International Film Festival of Portugal. We like to be present in the Portuguese cultural life and we always have a special affection for all the cultural projects we get to work with and IndieLisboa is one of the best chances we have to demonstrate that. ”

César Oteiza – General Director of idealista Portugal

“We are very happy to have a partnership with a brand such as idealista, because we have the opportunity to work with different sectors and show that cinema can often have a dialogue with different brands and that working together can give birth to even more creative and original ideas.”

Miguel Valverde – Director of IndieLisboa

Get carried away by the songs of IndieMusic with our Spotify playlists

This year, IndieLisboa expands its online presence and creates a profile on the Spotify music platform.

Film buffs, fans of all genres of music and festival visitors can now follow IndieLisboa on the streaming platform and listen to the playlists, composed of many of the songs that mark the films of this year’s IndieMusic section, where the focus always is the artists and bands that fill our world with music.

Users can immerse themselves in the songs of IndieMusic 2019 and feel the pulse of the programming that is to come but they can also revisite the sounds of last year’s edition.

Visit our Spotify profile and get carried away by music.

IndieMusic 2019: Miles Davis, Swans, Karen Dalton and a lot of Portuguese music

Here is the (almost full) program of this year’s IndieMusic, the section that is entirely dedicated to music within the IndieLisboa programming. We invite everyone to immerse themselves in the moving images of this year’s films in the teaser below and embrace the section’s songs and artists in our playlist.

It is a strong year for Portuguese music. Ela é uma Música is a journey through the world of rock in Portugal, through the voices of its illustrious unknown women. We explore the suburbs of Lisbon in which there’s a series of musicians and producers from different generations and origins. Batida de Lisboa goes from Angola to São Tomé, passing through Cape Verde and Guine Bissau. The trip ends in Alvalade, the neighborhood of Um Punk Chamado Ribas, one of the most important names in Portuguese music and one of the main drivers of the punk movement.

Also in Portuguese and in a very special screening, the return of Rollana Beat. The band invited 13 directors, including some of our festival’s familiar faces such as Edgar Pêra, Isabel Aboim Inglês or Leonor Noivo, to create videos for 13 songs made between 1998-2002.

From the rest of the world comes the folk of Karen Dalton (The Bright Light – Karen and the Process), the free jazz of John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman and Sun Ra (Fire Music), the coolness of Miles Davis (Birth of the Cool), the DIY music from bands such as Deerhoof, Xiu Xiu or Fugazi (Parallel Plans), the return of legendary rock band from Zambia, WITCH, with the help of Jacco Gardner (We Intend to Cause Havoc) and the indescribable energy of the Swans (Where Does a Body End?).

The jury of IndieMusic’s competitive section, which awards a prize of 1000€ for its best film, is composed of musician Bruno Pernadas, journalist and music publisher Isilda Sanches and music critic and illustrator Tiago da Bernarda (aka O Gato Mariano).

To ready our bodies for music, we will be celebrating the release of IndieMusic’s programming with an IndieLisboa warm-up party at Casa Independente next Saturday, March 9, with the songs of all these bands and artists.

Here is the list of the confirmed films so far:

Competition

A Bright Light – Karen and the Process (Emmanuelle Antilles)
Batida de Lisboa (Rita Maia e Vasco Viana) – World Premiere
Ela É Uma Música (Francisca Marvão) – World Premiere
Fire Music (Tom Surgal) – International Premiere
Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool (Stanley Nelson)
Parallel Planes (Nicole Wegner)
Um Punk Chamado Ribas (Paulo Antunes) – World Premiere
We Intend to Cause Havoc (Gio Arlotta)- World Premiere
Where Does a Body End? (Marco Porsia) – World Premiere

Special Screening
Vídeos: Rollana Beat (several directors) – World Premiere